Longevity on the Bruce

On a cliff above Georgian Bay at Lion’s Head is the oldest living tree in Ontario. It’s not a towering majestic pine or hardwood. It’s a lowly, twisted, gnarley white cedar that you probably wouldn’t give a second glance. Yet that tree has clung to its rocky perch for 1,316 years! Its remote and ruggedContinue reading “Longevity on the Bruce”

A trip around the Bay

Georgian Bay’s coasts, communities, islands, people and their history are begging to be explored. For the early part of my life I was able to soak up the southeastern part of the Bay that way. But by mid-life I was getting frustrated at not knowing, first-hand, the rest of what I privately considered my homeContinue reading “A trip around the Bay”

Catch and release, because you never know…

Does heredity make good anglers? I don’t know if Izaac Walton covered that topic in his fishing bible (The Compleat Angler, of 1653), but the Chisholm boys in the 20th Century cause me to wonder. If it’s true, Steve and Robin Chisholm came by their talent, first, through their father Sandy who I remember asContinue reading “Catch and release, because you never know…”

Keewatin memories, and a plea to keep her here

Alan Howard, a friendly and loquatious marine enthusiast of Toronto, knew all about the Canadian Pacific white fleet that steamed weekly between Port McNicoll and the Lakehead. In the early Sixties, he and other steam buffs had taken the trip on the almost-twins Keewatin and Assiniboia, as they correctly guessed that the service would soonContinue reading “Keewatin memories, and a plea to keep her here”

Viewing the Bay at its best from a rock camp

This canoe camper captures the gentle and raw nature of Georgian Bay at a season when few, if any, others are about. On Philip Edward Island, despite ice still choking Collins Inlet, he watches myriad early birds returning from migration, sees an otter prowling the rocks, gazes at the spring stars, a “red” moon andContinue reading “Viewing the Bay at its best from a rock camp”